Stop Declawing Cats – What Vets Aren’t Telling You.

THE TRUTH ABOUT DECLAWING: WHAT VETS AREN’T TELLING YOU

(ANIMAL WELFARE/PETS) Declawing a cat is the equivalent to amputating a human finger at the third knuckle, and yet twenty-two million domestic cats per year are declawed in the United States—a third of which reap serious behavioral and physical consequences from the procedure.

Due to a general ignorance and perpetuation by greedy vets, the procedure remains one of the most common in the United States for family pets.

The detrimental results of this procedure has led to its ban in over twenty countries but it’s a trend not followed by the U.S. due to the backlash from national veterinary associations who reap tremendous financial gain from the practice.

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Approximately 22 million domestic cats are declawed in the U.S. every year. Photo Credit: Nick Ridley via Getty Images

Dr. Jennifer Conrad, a veterinarian who specializes in exotic pets, is at the forefront of a recent campaign to ban declawing nationwide. Conrad is featured in a documentary called The Paw Project, which follows her non-profit movement to ban declawing and help cats already subjected to the procedure.

Her documentary explores specific cases of domestic and wild cats who suffer from the side effects of declawing. One particularly appalling story describes a mountain lion whose pain forced him to walk on his elbows and prevented him from attaining water. Sadly, he eventually died from renal failure.

“With so many thousands of big cats who need their paws repaired, I realized, there must be millions of domestic cats, the ones who live in our homes, who need their paws repaired,” Conrad said.

The feline nail, unlike the human nail, is embedded within the bone and in order to remove it, veterinarians will axe the entire third phalange from the feline’s paw. The most common way of declawing is to place the nail and the last bone through the guillotine of a nail clipper, which is, according to Conrad, “the equivalent of taking cigar cutters and slipping (her) finger through and cutting (the) whole last bone off.”

Cat claws are embedded within their bones. Photo Credit: pawprojectmovie.com

Cat claws are embedded within their bones. Photo Credit: pawprojectmovie.com

“Imagine somebody takes your feet that you walk on everyday and cuts your toes and then says: oh yeah, have a nice life, ” said Erika Willhite, a cat guardian who, at age 19, decided to have her cat declawed for lack of better knowledge. “Seriously, the worst decision I’ve made in my entire life,” she said.

The removal of the bone and claw also has unhealthy, harmful side effects for your feline, including infection, abnormal claw growth within the toe, inflammation, arthritis, behavioral changes such as increased aggression and biting, as well as emotional trauma and an inability to walk comfortably.

Unfortunately, although the evidence against the inhumane amputation should be enough to outlaw the practice, overarching veterinary associations—including the American Veterinary Association and California Veterinary Association—are leading the defense of the procedure.

An anonymous veterinarian shared with Conrad that he makes upwards of $75,000 dollars per year from declawing alone and refuses to give up the cruel practice, recommending it for every cat.

“(There is) such an injustice in the fact that it’s their doctors doing it to them and it’s even worse because their doctors aren’t telling what they’re doing,” Conrad said.

Before you consider declawing your cat, it’s important to know all the facts and be aware your veterinarian may not be transparent about the harms of the procedure.

Declawing has many side effects including infection, emotional trauma, behavioral changes, pain, arthritis. Photo credit: change.org

Declawing has many side effects including infection, emotional trauma, behavioral changes, pain, and arthritis. Photo credit: change.org

Here are five main reasons to forgo declawing your feline companion:

THE TRUTH ABOUT DECLAWING: WHAT VETS AREN’T TELLING YOU by Dori Edwards on November 10, 2015  739  9  3  759 (ANIMAL WELFARE/PETS) Declawing a cat is the equivalent to amputating a human finger at the third knuckle, and yet twenty-two million domestic cats per year are declawed in the United States—a third of which reap serious behavioral and physical consequences from the procedure. Due to a general ignorance and perpetuation by greedy vets, the procedure remains one of the most common in the United States for family pets. The detrimental results of this procedure has led to its ban in over twenty countries but it’s a trend not followed by the U.S. due to the backlash from national veterinary associations who reap tremendous financial gain from the practice. Approximately 22 million domestic cats are declawed in the U.S. every year. Photo Credit: Nick Ridley via Getty Images Dr. Jennifer Conrad, a veterinarian who specializes in exotic pets, is at the forefront of a recent campaign to ban declawing nationwide. Conrad is featured in a documentary called The Paw Project, which follows her non-profit movement to ban declawing and help cats already subjected to the procedure. Her documentary explores specific cases of domestic and wild cats who suffer from the side effects of declawing. One particularly appalling story describes a mountain lion whose pain forced him to walk on his elbows and prevented him from attaining water. Sadly, he eventually died from renal failure. “With so many thousands of big cats who need their paws repaired, I realized, there must be millions of domestic cats, the ones who live in our homes, who need their paws repaired,” Conrad said. The feline nail, unlike the human nail, is embedded within the bone and in order to remove it, veterinarians will axe the entire third phalange from the feline’s paw. The most common way of declawing is to place the nail and the last bone through the guillotine of a nail clipper, which is, according to Conrad, “the equivalent of taking cigar cutters and slipping (her) finger through and cutting (the) whole last bone off.” Cat claws are embedded within their bones. Photo Credit: pawprojectmovie.com “Imagine somebody takes your feet that you walk on everyday and cuts your toes and then says: oh yeah, have a nice life, ” said Erika Willhite, a cat guardian who, at age 19, decided to have her cat declawed for lack of better knowledge. “Seriously, the worst decision I’ve made in my entire life,” she said. The removal of the bone and claw also has unhealthy, harmful side effects for your feline, including infection, abnormal claw growth within the toe, inflammation, arthritis, behavioral changes such as increased aggression and biting, as well as emotional trauma and an inability to walk comfortably. Unfortunately, although the evidence against the inhumane amputation should be enough to outlaw the practice, overarching veterinary associations—including the American Veterinary Association and California Veterinary Association—are leading the defense of the procedure. An anonymous veterinarian shared with Conrad that he makes upwards of $75,000 dollars per year from declawing alone and refuses to give up the cruel practice, recommending it for every cat. “(There is) such an injustice in the fact that it’s their doctors doing it to them and it’s even worse because their doctors aren’t telling what they’re doing,” Conrad said. Before you consider declawing your cat, it’s important to know all the facts and be aware your veterinarian may not be transparent about the harms of the procedure. Declawing has many side effects including infection, emotional trauma, behavioral changes, pain, and arthritis. Photo credit: change.org Here are five main reasons to forgo declawing your feline companion:

Infection, Emotional trauma, behavioral changes, pain, arthritis 


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